Invasive Plants

Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota)

Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota)
Photo by Eric Howe
Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota)
Photo by Eric Howe
Queen Anne’s Lace (Daucus carota) forming seeds
Photo by Eric Howe

Comparison of Queen Anne’s Lace with the Native Cowbane

The NATIVE Cowbane (Oxypolis rigidior) shown above superficially resembles Queen Anne’s Lace. Note that there are less umbelets that make up the entire umbel.
Photo by Eric Howe

White Sweet Clover (Melilotus alba)

White Sweet Clover (Melilotus alba)
Photo by Eric Howe

Common Mullein (Verbascum thapsus)

Common Mullein (Verbascum thapsus) Photo by Eric Howe
Common Mullein (Verbascum thapsus) Photo by Eric Howe

Common St. John’s-Wort (Hypericum perforatum)

Common St. John’s-Wort (Hypericum perforatum)
Photo by Pam Holy

Common St. John’s Wort has translucent ‘dots’ on the leaves when held up to the light (left image above) as well as black dots along the margins of the petals (right image above and below).
Photo by Eric Howe

Common St. John’s-Wort (Hypericum perforatum) Photo by Eric Howe

Comparisons of Common St. John’s-Wort with other the native species

LEFT: The NON-native Common St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum)
RIGHT: The NATIVE Shrubby St. John’s Wort (Hypericum prolificum). The native lacks the two features noted above and has a profusion of yellow stamens.
Click the above image for greater detail.
Photo by Eric Howe
LEFT: The NON-native Common St. John’s Wort (Hypericum perforatum)
RIGHT: The False Toadflax (Comandra umbellata) for comparison. This native, which may no longer be in bloom when ST. John’s Wort blooms, has alternate leaves versus the opposite leaves of Common St. John’s Wort.
Photo by Eric Howe

Grasping the base of the stems of this plant as low as you can get (where it transitions the root at soil level), and a slow pull, will allow one to get as much of the roots as possible. Pull too fast, or only one of the stems of a multi-stem plant, and the stem is more likely to break off from the root.